Interview with Rosiee Thor, author of Fire Becomes Her

Hey everyone! Today I’m here with an author who’ve I’d had visit my blog before – Rosiee Thor! The last time that Rosiee visited here, it was my very first author interview and we discussed their debut novel, Tarnished are the Stars. You can find that interview here. But Rosiee recently had another book published – their sophomore novel Fire Becomes Her came out on February 1, and today we’re here to discuss this new book! Let’s check out what Fire Becomes Her is about, first.

Fire Becomes Her | Rosiee Thor

Published February 1, 2022

368 pages | Hardcover

Flare is power.

With only a drop of flare, one can light the night sky with fireworks . . . or burn a building to the ground — and seventeen-year-old Ingrid Ellis wants her fair share.

Ingrid doesn’t have a family fortune, monetary or magical, but at least she has a plan: Rise to the top on the arm of Linden Holt, heir to a hefty political legacy and the largest fortune of flare in all of Candesce. Her only obstacle is Linden’s father who refuses to acknowledge her.

So when Senator Holt announces his run for president, Ingrid uses the situation to her advantage. She strikes a deal to spy on the senator’s opposition in exchange for his approval and the status she so desperately craves. But the longer Ingrid wears two masks, the more she questions where her true allegiances lie.

Will she stand with the Holts, or will she forge her own path?

Summary from Goodreads

So first of all, just tell us a little about yourself!

Hello! I’m Rosiee, author of queer science fiction and fantasy novels. I have two published novels: Fire Becomes Her and Tarnished are the Stars. I’m also an avid gardener and mediocre gamer!

Fire Becomes Her is your sophomore novel, and it’s a fantasy, unlike your debut science fiction, Tarnished Are the Stars. What was different about writing a fantasy book this time, and why did you choose to do so?

It might be a little odd to say this but… not much was different. Science Fiction and Fantasy are really just two sides of the same coin. The difference is really just what you call it–technology or magic? So as far as genre, I still had a lot of the same considerations to make about how the magic/tech worked and how much of that was going to get explained. At the end of the day, it was more of a marketing decision than a clear distinction of genre, since they both contain elements of science and magic.

I think one of the biggest things in Fire Becomes Her was the extremely unique worldbuilding, as well as a government system that was a huge part of the book. The book centers around the use of magic called Flare. How did you come up with the idea of Flare and all its uses throughout the book?

Figuring out the magic system for this book was absolutely central to the world building. Basically, Flare is fire magic that you can drink, but it’s also so much more than that.

I wanted to play around with magic, but I wanted that magic to play a deep and inexorable role in the world. No one lives in that world without being impacted by magic in one way or another. I decided to tie it to multiple areas of society to make sure it was fully entrenched, so it’s the social equivalent of alcohol, the economic equivalent of oil, and the aesthetic equivalent of fire. This allowed me to play around with magic in every aspect of their society–wealth, status, politics, vibe…etc.

In FBH, you highlighted several different identities on the aromantic and asexual spectrums, and two of these characters also ended up in a queerplatonic relationship. Can you tell readers a little bit about these identities, and what it means for you to write them?

I knew from the beginning that I wanted to write about a character discovering her aromantic identity and what it means to her, but I didn’t really know what that was going to look like until I started writing. Ingrid’s a lot like me and her experiences with relationships and the discomfort she feels in romantic situations is drawn directly from my life. When I first started writing stories, I didn’t think characters like her would be well received by publishing at all, so to have my editor give me the go-ahead to write the story the way I wanted to was such a freeing experience. I got to follow my own emotional logic instead of trying to piece it together based on how I assumed others might feel. I always knew I wanted Ingrid to make a big decision about her relationship to romance, but the idea to center a queer platonic partnership in the story didn’t occur to me until I was a bit further into the draft. Originally, I had planned to write a sequel which would allow more time and space for that relationship to form, but when my publisher only bought one book, I realized I didn’t want to leave it out in hopes I’d get the opportunity to write the sequel. I didn’t want to leave that up to chance and not get to write this relationship, so I reconfigured the story and gave certain characters more page-time to make sure they got the story I intended.

The first time I interviewed you, I asked how you grew through writing Tarnished Are the Stars and I want to ask you the same question again. Do you think you grew more through writing Tarnished or FBH?

I definitely grew a lot while writing Fire Becomes Her. As a writer, certainly, but also as a person. I always find things out about myself through writing that I don’t really anticipate. With Tarnished, I learned a lot about my own identity on the ace and aro spectrums, but with Fire Becomes Her I was surprised to find some of my own feelings about gender, pronouns, and perception echoed in one of the other characters in the book, Alex. I knew I was a lot like Ingrid and her journey would mirror parts of my own, but I did not expect to see myself in him and his non-binary experience. It forced me to think a lot about myself and my relationship to gender in ways that deepened my understanding of my own identity. 

How would you describe FBH in one sentence, to someone who hasn’t read it yet?

An ambitious girl must choose between her head and her heart during an election where magic buys votes.

What do you think would happen in an interaction between the main characters of Tarnished are the Stars, and Fire Becomes Her? Do you think your characters would get along?

I don’t think Ingrid would get along very well with any of the main characters of Tarnished, to be honest. She’s a little too prickly in a very specific way for them. She and Eliza might do okay, but I think Eliza would see right through her and Ingrid wouldn’t love that. I do think Charlotte and Nathaniel would get along swimmingly, and Louise and Anna would be like two angry peas in a pod.

And lastly, unrelated to your writing, but what are some books that you’ve enjoyed reading in the past few months?

The last year or so has brought some amazing books to my shelves. A few favorites are In The Ravenous Dark by A.M. Strickland, The Mermaid The Witch and The Sea by Maggie Tokuda-Hall, and The Reckless Kind by Carly Heath.

Ha you read Fire Becomes Her, or heard of the author? What did you think of the interview? Are you interested in picking up this book?

Little Thieves by Margaret Owen: Book Review

Hey all! Seeing as this is a book blog, I figured I should probably actually write a book review. You know, because that seems like a pretty important part of a book blog. And I haven’t actually done this in a while (when was the last time? July???) Whoops. Anyways, I got Little Thieves for Christmas and really enjoyed it, so I thought that this may as well be my first book review in a while!

Little Thieves | Margaret Owen

Published October 19, 2021

500 pages | Hardcover

Trigger warnings: Child abandonment, sexual harassment, poisoning (if you’re unsure if there’s a trigger, you might want to check someone else’s trigger warnings because I’m bad at this)

Vanja Schmidt looks after herself. Abandoned by her mother at age 4, she was adopted as the goddaughter of Death and Fortune, who raised her for some time until they left her to become Princess Gisele’s dutiful servant. But when Vanja’s godmothers reappear and demand she train under one of them as a price for their care, she knows that she needs to get out. So Vanja steals Princess Gisele’s place and begins a life as a princess, all while thieving from nobles and stocking up for a way to get out of this country and away from her godmothers’ grasps for good.

Vanja has almost reached the money she needs for freedom when she robs the wrong people and is cursed by a god to turn into jewels one by one unless she can figure out and complete the god’s riddled answer for how to break the curse. Not only that, but she’s stuck with the god’s daughter as a guardian and a junior detective on her tail who is eager to figure out who’s been stealing money. And she has two weeks before she turns into gems for good.

All summaries are my own unless otherwise stated. Parts of the summary may be borrowed from goodreads.

Wow. I knew I was in for a treat with this book after loving Margaret Owen’s first series, The Merciful Crow, but I just had no idea how much! Little Thieves is based off of the tale The Goose Girl, which I know very little about, but it did not at all stop me from enjoying this book.

The world and the plot were both beautifully done in this story, as always, but what I think really stood out to me was the characters. At the beginning of the book, Vanja is utterly by herself, posing as Princess Gisele and navigating the world as a noble while simultaneously stealing from the rich who she parties with. She’s clever and trusts no one. But as the story goes on, we meet more and more people and slowly she has a whole little group to work with and begin to trust.

I think that my favorite character was probably Ragne. Ragne is the daughter of the god who cursed Vanja, and she’s sent to watch over Vanja as she attempts to solve her curse. Ragne is definitely a bit of comic relief, because she’s a shape shifter who has NOT spent a lot of time in a human body or talking to humans, but she’s also the first person who Vanja really spends time with and trusts, and that was nice to see how she and Vanja started to get along.

Okay, the plot of this book is great, and I don’t really know where to start because there was just so much of it! There were a few times when I was halfway through or a little farther than halfway, and I would wonder ‘okay how is this not the climax’ but it kept going! And don’t worry, it made logical sense that it continued, and it was still very enjoyable. Still, I couldn’t wait to find out what happens next, and a lot of the characters were really clever or had different sides so it was very difficult to figure out what might happen or where the story was going! Plus, there were a lot of exterior forces at play, for example Vanja’s godmothers who she did NOT want interfering with what she was doing, so it felt like a twist could happen at any time.

I do feel like the world could have been explored a little better. It’s clearly set in a fantasy world, but we’re given a lot of names and not a lot of explanation for those names. Vanja wants to escape from the place where she is (city? country? see how little I know), and she keeps mentioning places she might want to go, but I don’t know anything about those places and it was a little frustrating. Even within the story and where she was at the moment, things were still a little foggy.

This is the kind of book that 100% needs a map, and I actually went back to check if it had one, because it really seemed like it should, but it doesn’t, unfortunately.

Still, even though the worldbuilding was a bit underdeveloped, and I’m kind of disappointed in that aspect because it seemed like an awesome world, I just knew nothing about it aside from names of places, I’m not going to take off any stars or anything because of that. For me, worldbuilding is always a bit of a bonus rather than a necessity. Obviously I need something, a book can’t be set in a totally undescribed setting and world, but as long as I know exactly where the main character is at any given time (for example: castle, marketplace, etc), I’m okay.

PS can we take a moment to appreciate the amazing artwork in this book? This book is separated into chapters, it’s also separated into different parts (part one, part two, part three) but it’s ALSO separated into different ‘stories’ which are different from the ‘parts’ in a way that I cannot discern. Still, at the beginning of each story (there are seven of them throughout the book), there is a page that depicts a scene, and the art is absolutely lovely.

Want to read a few other reviews of Little Thieves? Check some out over at Pages Unbound and Becky’s Book Blog!

Have you read Little Thieves or The Merciful Crow? Do you know the story of the Goose Girl? What did you think of my review?

Enola Holmes Book Tag

Hey, everyone! I’m doing yet another tag this week because first of all I have a whole lot that I need to do and second of all I completely forgot about posting anything until today and I’m going on vacation today (I dont’ even know if this tag will actually get out because I may not have time.)
Anyways, let’s get into this!
This tag is based off of the movie (book?) Enola Holmes and I read the book and watched bits and pieces of the movie a while ago so I thought I’d try it out! (let’s not mention that I literally remember 4 of the characters mentioned here because my brain is great with names irl but terrible with names in books)
I was tagged for this by the wonderful Madeline @The Bookish Mutant and please go and check out her amazing blog!

~Rules~

  1. List the rules and the prompts of the tag in your post
  2. Thank the person who tagged you and pingback to their post
  3. Give credits to the creator of the tag, Bellerose Reads, and pingback to her post.
  4. Tag at least 5 people to do the tag.

Enola Holmes: An independent and smart female protagonist

I’ll go with a choice that I don’t usually stick in book tags here–Emanuela from Beyond the Ruby Veil. The book itself was a little bit meh (bow down to my descriptive skills) but I would definitely describe our main character as ‘independent and smart’. She’s also a morally grey character so if you like that kind of stuff, maybe you should try this book!

Sherlock Holmes: Your favorite mystery/thriller book

Uh wow I don’t read much mystery or thriller. I think I’ll go with The Girls I’ve Been by Tess Sharpe–it was the most recent thriller I’ve read and it was also very good!

Eudoria Holmes: A character that defies the rules of their society

I don’t know if this is rules so much as stereotypes and judgement but throughout I’ll Be The One, Skye constantly has to face doubters and haters who don’t think she can/should be in a KPop competition given that she’s fat. She never backs down from the competition and shows everyone that no matter what you look like, you can get to your dreams.

Mycroft Holmes: The most annoying character you know

Uh wow that’s really tough. I mean, there’s a lot of annoying characters out there but how do I choose THE MOST annoying? My first thought went to characters who are homophobic/transphobic, etc. who are the antagonists of books (Simon vs, Felix Ever After) but those characters aren’t what I’d describe ‘annoying’, they’re awful. So I really don’t know what I’d go for, here.

Lord Tewksbury: A character you want to protect at all costs

There’s so many, but I’m going with what my brain immediately thought of: Jesper and Wylan (I know, I know, it’s two, I’m sorry…). I dunno, they are both just such beans and I must make sure they don’t get hurt. Though, if I had to choose one, I’d choose Wylan.

Inspector Lestrade: A loyal side character

My brain sometimes just thinks of a random book I wouldn’t have thought of otherwise, but I’ll go with Miles from Lore for this one. Miles is just a complete mortal with no connection to any of the greek god stuff going on in Lore but when Lore finds a dying goddess outside her house, he helps her with that. Lore and the others, too, constantly tell him to get out of there because it’s dangerous for him and he doesn’t need to be there but he stays and also proves himself useful many times.

Miss Harrison: A book that aged like milk

At first I was very confused as to what ‘like milk’ meant because clearly I don’t know that milk spoils okay then. Anyways. A book that aged badly…I can’t think of anything that aged too badly but recently I read the fourth book in the Magic Misfits series and it just wasn’t as enjoyable as I remember the first three being, probably because I’m just not as young anymore.

Linthorn: A character you hated from the very beginning

I guess I’ll say Minya from Strange the Dreamer, here. I get that Minya had a really traumatizing past and she was just trying to protect everyone, but she went around with it in a very bad way and she was just all out cruel.

Edith: Your favorite book with black rep.

It was really tough to choose, here, but I think I’ll go with Felix Ever After. It was just a really enjoyable book, possibly my favorite realistic fiction ever. It kept me totally engaged the whole time and I devoured it in one sitting to finish it.

Alright, there’s the end of the tag! I’m not gonna tag anyone because I don’t know who has/hasn’t watched/read the movie/book but if you have watched or read it, please try out this tag! It was super fun to do!

That’s all for this post! I really hope that you enjoyed reading this as much as I enjoyed doing it! Thank you so much for stopping by my little corner of the internet and have an amazing rest of your day! Sorry if this tag came off as a little bit rushed (because it was, indeed, rather rushed, but I still loved doing it). As always, stay safe and keep on reading!

End of the year Superlatives tag

Yeah, I know what you’re thinking. It’s been more than a month since the year actually ended. And it’s taken me way too long to do this tag. Super sorry but hopefully everyone will enjoy it anyways!
I was tagged for this tag by the lovely Alex @The Scribe Owl. This is her first original tag so I really hope that you check her original post and her blog when you have time!

~Rules~

  • Fill out each of the prompts with your answer. Each character/book you choose has to be one you read in 2020.
  • Tag as many or few people as you want, but preferably somewhere around 10.
  • Have fun and happy new year!!

~Book Tag~

I just want to say one thing before I begin, the first part of this tag is a lot like my bookish awards that I do in each of my wrap ups. Therefore, my answers for a few of these questions will probably be the exact same thing as in those awards for my December/yearly wrap up. So sorry for any repeats that you read!

Best Villain

As I said in my yearly wrap up post, I cannot tell you.
That is to say, I believe that the best villain I read in 2020 was in Crown of Feathers by Nicki Pau Preto. Unfortunately, said villain isn’t actually introduced as a villain until about halfway through the book at least and as much as I love spoiling things for my family members, I’m not going to go around spoiling this entire book for all of you.
Bottom line: you want to know the best villain? Read the darn book.


Best Main Character

Fie from The Merciful Crow by Margaret Owens was the best main character I read this year. Fie’s a super fun main character because she’s just so determined and…well, there was something about her that made her really likeable in my opinion. I don’t know what it was and also I read these books several months ago and my brain is immune to retaining book-related information. Maybe I’ve just read so many books that my brain has just decided it can’t possibly keep all the information about all the books so it just decides to keep none. Who knows?


Best side character

Well, this one took me a bit to figure out. I was very torn between Silas, from Sorcery of Thorns, and Felicity from The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue. In the end I chose Silas because Felicity does actually get her own book in The Montague Siblings series.
Anyways. Silas. I actually can’t remember what I loved so much about him but he was just…oh my gosh, it’s a shocker any of you put up with my posts because I feel like half of them are just ‘I don’t know why I liked ___ but I did :)’.
Anyways. Trying to think back to what I liked about him. Also looking back at my Sorcery of Thorns review. I think I liked Silas because you could tell that he really did care about Nathaniel. Even though he was under this contract and he was…certainly interesting when he was not bound, it still really felt like he really did care about Nathaniel.


Tough luck: a character you’re glad you aren’t

Honestly, I think I’m going to have to agree with Alex for this one…I would definitely not want to be Kaz Brekker from Six of Crows. He’s just…well, if you’ve read it, you know, if you haven’t, go read it what are you waiting for.


Best place to raise a family: A place that you wouldn’t mind settling down in

Oh how could I not say it.
No actually I literally cannot say it now, I’ve forgotten the world name and because it would be an embarrassment if I actually posted this like this…time to ask someone.
Hello I’m back and wow how could I possibly forget.
Living in the lost cities, from Keeper of the Lost Cities would be AMAZING (and yes, I literally forgot what the lost cities were called). Honestly, I sort of feel like Shannon Messenger just took out all the bad things from our world and added a whole bunch of good food and bam, we have the lost cities. I want to eat that food so badddddd. (oh look, it’s my daily reminder that I need to read 8.5. I OWN the darn book, I need to get to it!)


Uninhabitable: A setting you would never want to live in

Ah, well, eh heh.
There’re countless books out there with terrible worlds. You know, the ones where women are super oppressed, things like that (it’s always the women. Always. I mean, reading a book where there are oppressed men who fight a bunch of women to land on top does not sound like a fun time but even in those books where the main point ISN’T actually fighting that oppression, it’s the women who are the oppressed. Fun times).
BUT I’ve chosen ‘1984’ by George Orwell.
Literally everything you do is watched and listened to.
If you step one toe out of line and are caught, you’re tortured until basically all you can think about is your loyalty for ‘Big Brother’.
Yeah, no thanks 🙂


Most likely to succeed: An indie or under-hyped book that everyone would like if they just tried it.

Not going to lie, I don’t follow the hype.
By which I mean I don’t even know where the hype is at any given time??? Here’s what I know: Six of Crows=hype. The Cruel Prince=hype. Everything else=? (I mean okay those were just the first two hyped YA books I could think of. I’m not going to go answering Percy Jackson or Harry Potter to this question).
But I’ll go with a book that was very good and I haven’t heard much about. That sounds underhyped, right? Probably? Hopefully?
Anyways. Dread Nation, by Justina Ireland. IT WAS SUPER GOOD. I loved the protagonist, Jane, as well as the other main character, Katherine. Plus, it’s got good rep! Jane is biracial and bisexual and Katherine is black and aro/ace.


Life of the party: a book that kept you laughing and having a good time

Okay so THIS one is quite EASILY ‘The Extraordinaries’ by TJ Klune. The Extraordinaries just kept me laughing throughout the whole book, it was just so funny and I just loved it because of that.


Most unforgettable: A book you couldn’t forget if you tried.

I…feel like it’s a bad sign if I have to actually LOOK THROUGH my 2020 books to find the ‘most unforgettable’ books. But the thing is, even if there is a book that is ‘unforgettable’ for me, if my memory isn’t jogged on it, I’m never going to think of it.
I swear this prompt is keeping me from doing the rest of the tag, I keep staring at it and going ‘I don’t know’ and turning to do something else AAAH.
Okay, here goes. Maybe I’m being a little bit boring here but I’m going to go with Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. Six of Crows is just…Six of Crows, I don’t know what else to say about it. It’s unforgettable.


Most unique: A book unlike anything you’ve ever read before

Don’t you just love when you’re doing a book tag and a book immediately pops into your mind when you see a question?
For this one I’m going with The Sound of Stars by Alechia Dow. Honestly, I wasn’t sure what to think of this book when I first went into it. It was, in fact, like nothing I’ve ever heard and the premise was just so different. The tagline is ‘Can their love of books and pop music save the world?’ But I did end up enjoying The Sound of Stars.


Well, that’s a wrap of this wonderful tag! I hope that you all really enjoyed doing this! I know a bunch of people who’ve been tagged for this already so apologies if you’ve already been tagged but here goes:

Alright! That’s all for today, friends! I hope that you enjoyed this post and I can’t wait to see you next week for a new type of post that I’m trying out that I hope you all will really enjoy!
What did you think of this post? What are some of your favorite books from 2020? Let me know in the comments!